Browsing the bookshelves

Stopped in the bookstore to browse the shelves and see if anything inspired me. I’d already stopped and bought Clay Shirky’s new book, Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations and it continues to be the most important book of 2008 IMHO.(If you’re looking for a pleasure read, pick up a copy of Cory Doctorow’s Little Brother, this book is Orwell’s 1984 for the Digital Generation, I found it worth the sleepless night).

I’m intrigued about the discussion of more in Enough: Breaking Free from the World of More. How people make decisions around needs and desires in North America is interesting. This is the basic studies of economics. For a long time, I had a hard time understanding the connection that Herb Simon made between economics, psychology, computer science and design. But this connection has lead to startups both successful ones and failures, but they have all been around understanding how people make decisions, assign value, and trying to design products and services to enable these decisions. I had a quick read of The Economic Naturalist: In Search of Explanations for Everyday Enigmas which did a great job explaining real-world perceptions and misperceptions of the world based on human behaviours.

Toronto is now my home. Having settled in Toronto, I’ve been frustrated by the lack of community. I’m looking forward to reading Small is Possible: Life in the Local Economy, if only to better set a plan for events like DemoCamp and Founders & Funders to better enable our Local Software Economy in Toronto.

Is it me, or does Wired feel relevant again? Wired 16.07 had a couple of articles that were just inspiring to read. The Petabyte Age: Because More Isn’t Just More – More Is Different contains articles about the secondary effects and analysis of data that becomes possible one you embrace big data. Feeding the Masses: Data In, Crop Predictions Out shows the power of GIS and agricultural data developed by Lanworth, it provides the power to enable market predictions. Makes me think I need to find time to read Super Crunchers: Why Thinking-by-Numbers is the New Way to be Smart. Need proof that there’s power in numbers look at the processing by the Idee folks for TinEye or at the relational models of pixels in images for PhotoSynth.

 

The Economic Naturalist: In Search of Explanations for Everyday Enigmas
by Robert Frank

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Super Crunchers: Why Thinking-by-Numbers Is the New Way to Be Smart
by Ian Ayres

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Small is Possible: Life in a Local Economy
by Lyle Estill

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Tribal Leadership: Leveraging Natural Groups to Build a Thriving Organization
by Dave Logan, John King, Halee Fischer-Wright

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The Age Curve: How to Profit from the Demographic Storm
by Kenneth W. Gronbach

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Flavor of the Month: Why Smart People Fall for Fads
by Joel Best

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Community: The Structure of Belonging
by Peter Block

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Simplexity: Why Simple Things Become Complex (and How Complex Things Can Be Made Simple)
by Jeffrey Kluger

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Enough: Breaking Free from the World of More
by John Naish

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The Empire of Mind: Digital Piracy and the Anti-Capitalist Movement (Digital Futures) (Digital Futures)
by Michael Strangelove

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Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations
by Clay Shirky

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Communities Dominate Brands
by Tomi T. Ahonen, Alan Moore

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Generation Blend: Managing Across the Technology Age Gap (Microsoft Executive Leadership Series)
by R. Salkowitz

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16 thoughts on “Browsing the bookshelves”

  1. Funny you should say that about Wired. The last issue (16.07) was so interesting I ended up buying a few copies to pass around so as not to circulate my copy! I also stumbled upon this Wired creative director interview which I thought was interesting:<br />
    <a href="http://aphotoeditor.com/2008/06/18/scott-dadich-creative-director-wired-magazine/<br />
    " target="_blank"><a href="http://aphotoeditor.com/2008/06/18/scott-dadich-c…</a>" target="_blank">http://aphotoeditor.com/2008/06/18/scott-dadich-c…</a></a> <br />
    Yes, I am loving Wired (this month!).

  2. Great list! I've only read Super Crunchers, and while it was a bit dry in places, it was a great read overall.<br />
    <br />
    I agree about Wired too…loving it lately!

  3. I agree about Wired, it's still putting out some quality material. It's one of the few sites I read often outside of RSS.<br />
    <br />
    For books I'm reading Innovators Dilemma and Agile Software Development with Scrum, both highly recommended.<br />
    <br />
    Might pick up Little Brother at some point but my amazon list is full of non-fiction.

  4. Great list! I’ve only read Super Crunchers, and while it was a bit dry in places, it was a great read overall.

    I agree about Wired too…loving it lately!

  5. I agree about Wired, it’s still putting out some quality material. It’s one of the few sites I read often outside of RSS.

    For books I’m reading Innovators Dilemma and Agile Software Development with Scrum, both highly recommended.

    Might pick up Little Brother at some point but my amazon list is full of non-fiction.

  6. I'd recommend Hochschild's &quot;Bury the Chains&quot;, which tells the story of the campaign to end slavery in the British Empire. As people are starting to point out, slavery was to those times what oil is to ours: economically vital, but morally repugnant. There are a lot of lessons in it for people who want to stop C-61, bring real change to Africa, or fight global warming.

  7. I’d recommend Hochschild’s “Bury the Chains”, which tells the story of the campaign to end slavery in the British Empire. As people are starting to point out, slavery was to those times what oil is to ours: economically vital, but morally repugnant. There are a lot of lessons in it for people who want to stop C-61, bring real change to Africa, or fight global warming.

  8. I moved up to Toronto from Boston where I had been for many years and I agree that there is not as much a sense of community within the tech sector. I don't know if this is because it is a bigger city of if people here are more skeptical/reserved about networking, but I do notice a difference. <br />
    <br />
    On the other hand, I find a great community in the neighbourhood where I run a contemporary art gallery (I have two lives – tech and art), so not sure how to explain the disconnect in the tech sector.<br />
    <br />
    Would love to do something about it if there is anything I can contribute to.

  9. Thanks for the list! I already have a few of these on hand to read, as well as Rohit Bhargava's Personality Not Included.<br />
    <br />
    Cheers,<br />
    Connie

  10. I moved up to Toronto from Boston where I had been for many years and I agree that there is not as much a sense of community within the tech sector. I don’t know if this is because it is a bigger city of if people here are more skeptical/reserved about networking, but I do notice a difference.

    On the other hand, I find a great community in the neighbourhood where I run a contemporary art gallery (I have two lives – tech and art), so not sure how to explain the disconnect in the tech sector.

    Would love to do something about it if there is anything I can contribute to.

  11. Supercrunchers is awesome :)<br />
    <br />
    Favourite book of the year though is 4 Hour Work Week…..

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